Eternal Life

“Radiant Death is Eternal Life"

~
Shaped & Designed by Logan Antill

Eternal Life

“Radiant Death is Eternal Life"

~

Shaped & Designed by Logan Antill

HISTORY AND BRAND INFLUENCES

I grew up in the desert. To my knowledge, no one in the history of my family has ever ridden a surfboard. Certainly no one in my family made surfboards. I was 30 years old the first time I touched a surfboard. I had been living in NYC writing films and novels and when I moved to South Florida surfing changed the entire course of my life. Board design immediately fascinated me. I basically started shaping the instant I started surfing. I didn’t have anyone to show me anything. I had no access to legacy teaching. I had no concept about what I was supposed to do. I didn’t know what was a conventional design and what wasn’t. The only person I knew who shaped was this kid who surfed in corduroy shorts and was always covered in jellyfish stings. He said he shaped a mini Simmons with an axe and if he could do it then so could I. 


There was a lot of trial and error in the beginning. Many ideas that were, at the time, beyond my ability to complete. I always wished I had some sort of mentor or teacher but I never found one. Even when I moved to California a lot of shapers shut me down when I asked to visit their bay, when I asked for help. It just made me want to work harder. To this day I’ve still never seen anyone else shape a surfboard in person. I would study photos of planer passes and think, ok what do those shadows mean, what are they creating with those lines, how do I make my rail bands look like that? I was just absolutely obsessive about learning. Practice, practice, practice. There’s no substitute for that. Learning to create with my hands what I see in my head. Still have a lot of work to do but I’m getting closer all the time.

HISTORY AND BRAND INFLUENCES


I grew up in the desert. To my knowledge, no one in the history of my family has ever ridden a surfboard. Certainly no one in my family made surfboards. I was 30 years old the first time I touched a surfboard. I had been living in NYC writing films and novels and when I moved to South Florida surfing changed the entire course of my life. Board design immediately fascinated me. I basically started shaping the instant I started surfing. I didn’t have anyone to show me anything. I had no access to legacy teaching. I had no concept about what I was supposed to do. I didn’t know what was a conventional design and what wasn’t. The only person I knew who shaped was this kid who surfed in corduroy shorts and was always covered in jellyfish stings. He said he shaped a mini Simmons with an axe and if he could do it then so could I.


I grew up in the desert. To my knowledge, no one in the history of my family has ever ridden a surfboard. Certainly no one in my family made surfboards. I was 30 years old the first time I touched a surfboard. I had been living in NYC writing films and novels and when I moved to South Florida surfing changed the entire course of my life. Board design immediately fascinated me. I basically started shaping the instant I started surfing. 


I didn’t have anyone to show me anything. I had no access to legacy teaching. I had no concept about what I was supposed to do. I didn’t know what was a conventional design and what wasn’t. The only person I knew who shaped was this kid who surfed in corduroy shorts and was always covered in jellyfish stings. He said he shaped a mini Simmons with an axe and if he could do it then so could I. There was a lot of trial and error in the beginning. Many ideas that were, at the time, beyond my ability to complete. I always wished I had some sort of mentor or teacher but I never found one. Even when I moved to California a lot of shapers shut me down when I asked to visit their bay, when I asked for help.

There was a lot of trial and error in the beginning. Many ideas that were, at the time, beyond my ability to complete. I always wished I had some sort of mentor or teacher but I never found one. Even when I moved to California a lot of shapers shut me down when I asked to visit their bay, when I asked for help. It just made me want to work harder. To this day I’ve still never seen anyone else shape a surfboard in person. I would study photos of planer passes and think, ok what do those shadows mean, what are they creating with those lines, how do I make my rail bands look like that? I was just absolutely obsessive about learning. Practice, practice, practice. There’s no substitute for that. Learning to create with my hands what I see in my head. Still have a lot of work to do but I’m getting closer all the time.

It just made me want to work harder. To this day I’ve still never seen anyone else shape a surfboard in person. I would study photos of planer passes and think, ok what do those shadows mean, what are they creating with those lines, how do I make my rail bands look like that? I was just absolutely obsessive about learning. Practice, practice, practice. There’s no substitute for that. Learning to create with my hands what I see in my head. Still have a lot of work to do but I’m getting closer all the time.

ETERNAL LIFE AESTHETIC

Since I didn’t come from a surfing background I kinda brought my experience with other art disciplines into my shaping. I studied film and literature most of my life. So I’m trying to merge those influences together into Eternal Life, which I think of more as an art collective than a surfboard brand. I like collaborating with artists outside the surf world to release limited edition capsule collections. Painters, sculptors, musicians and graphic designers. 


Once you free yourself from the constraints of expectation about what a surfboard is supposed to look like in order for it to perform “correctly” - you can literally make whatever you want. Doesn’t mean designs have to get more and more complex - quite the opposite. Look at designs crafted by nature and you find a more singularly unified artistic vision. Another thing we can learn from nature: the aesthetic resonance of an object or creature is just as important as the hydrodynamic or biological function. Nature rejoices in beauty.


I have to please myself first. If I’m not pleasing myself then I have no integrity as an artist. That’s why I only make boards I want to make. Noseriders for example, traditional logs - I don’t ride them so I don’t shape them.


I have to please myself first. If I’m not pleasing myself then I have no integrity as an artist. That’s why I only make boards I want to make. Noseriders for example, traditional logs - I don’t ride them so I don’t shape them.


Shaping for me isn’t about fortune and glory. 


Sure I want to make a living but only so much as I get to create joyful authentic work. If it’s just for a paycheck I will bow out. The last thing I want to see are Eternal Life t-shirts in a surf shop beside flip-flops and cargo shorts; or my boards mass-produced by hourly workers in a factory. I’d rather make nothing than look over my designs and feel beige indifference. I’m happy to be a small production, to handshape every board I make.

Currently Riding

Mostly twins and singles between 6’2 - 9’2. Boards that go fast and turn. I will happily trade stability for speed. I’m constantly testing new prototypes, tweaking, shaping again. Right now I’m really enjoying these long fish and sleek speed shapes. Also edge boards! Over the past couple years I’ve been trying to dial in my edge board design - finding a balance between speed & control. They are incredibly satisfying to shape and on a good wave the sensation is unparalleled.

What's your favorite place to surf?

I live in North County San Diego within walking distance to the beach so often it’s easiest to surf very close to home. Generally I surf every day. Even if it’s crappy. Or especially if it’s crappy. Sometimes the amount of humans who are in the ocean with surfboards in California makes me feel fairly despondent. The less hype there is for a swell the more fun I have. I also enjoy taking road trips up and down the coast, surfing with different friends in different towns. I love new waves that probably don’t have a name.

Eternal Life Surfboards